Certified Benz & Beemer Compares 2016 Jeep Wrangler VS 2016 Mercedes G-Class Near Scottsdale, AZ

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2016 Jeep Wrangler

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VS

2016 Mercedes G-Class

Safety Comparison

The Wrangler’s gas tank is mounted inside the frame rails in front of the rear axle to optimally protect the fuel tank in a collision. The Mercedes G-Class’ gas tank is mounted behind the rear axle, where it is more susceptible to rear collisions.

Both the Wrangler and the G-Class have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available front seat side-impact airbags and head airbags.

Warranty Comparison

Jeep’s powertrain warranty covers the Wrangler 1 year and 10,000 miles longer than Mercedes covers the G-Class. Any repair needed on the engine, transmission, axles, joints or driveshafts is fully covered for 5 years or 60,000 miles. Coverage on the G-Class ends after only 4 years or 50,000 miles.

The Wrangler’s corrosion warranty is 1 year and 50,000 miles longer than the G-Class’ (5/100,000 vs. 4/50,000).

There are over 9 times as many Jeep dealers as there are Mercedes dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the Wrangler’s warranty.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Wrangler Unlimited Auto gets better fuel mileage than the G550 (17 city/20 hwy vs. 13 city/14 hwy).

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Jeep Wrangler uses regular unleaded gasoline. The G-Class requires premium, which can cost 20 to 55 cents more per gallon.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

The Wrangler stops shorter than the G-Class:

Wrangler

G-Class

70 to 0 MPH

204 feet

210 feet

Car and Driver

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The Wrangler has standard front and rear stabilizer bars, which help keep the Wrangler flat and controlled during cornering. The G-Class’ suspension doesn’t offer a rear stabilizer bar.

The Wrangler Rubicon has an active front sway bar, which helps keep it flat and controlled during cornering, but disconnects at lower speeds to smooth the ride and offer greater off-road suspension articulation. This helps keep the tires glued to the road on-road and off. The G-Class doesn’t offer an active sway bar system.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Wrangler Unlimited’s wheelbase is 3.8 inches longer than on the G-Class (116 inches vs. 112.2 inches).

For better handling and stability, the track (width between the wheels) on the Wrangler is 2.3 inches wider in the front and 2.3 inches wider in the rear than on the G-Class.

The Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited handles at .61 G’s, while the G65 pulls only .58 G’s of cornering force in a Car and Driver skidpad test.

The Wrangler Sahara Unlimited goes through Motor Trend’s slalom 3.1 MPH faster than the G63 (56.2 vs. 53.1 MPH).

For better maneuverability, the Wrangler 2dr’s turning circle is 9.7 feet tighter than the G-Class’ (34.9 feet vs. 44.6 feet). The Wrangler Unlimited’s turning circle is 3.4 feet tighter than the G-Class’ (41.2 feet vs. 44.6 feet).

For greater off-road capability the Wrangler Sport Unlimited has a greater minimum ground clearance than the G-Class (8.2 vs. 8.1 inches), allowing the Wrangler to travel over rougher terrain without being stopped or damaged. The Wrangler Rubicon 2dr’s minimum ground clearance is 1.9 inches higher than on the G-Class (10 vs. 8.1 inches).

Chassis Comparison

The Jeep Wrangler may be more efficient, handle and accelerate better because it weighs about 1550 to 2050 pounds less than the Mercedes G-Class.

The Wrangler 2dr is 1 foot, 11.2 inches shorter than the G63/G65, making the Wrangler easier to handle, maneuver and park in tight spaces.

Ergonomics Comparison

The Wrangler Sahara/Rubicon Automatic offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The G-Class doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

The Wrangler’s instruments include an oil pressure gauge and a temperature gauge – which could save your engine! Often ‘idiot lights’ don’t warn you until damage has been done. The G-Class does not have an oil pressure gauge.

To shield the driver and front passenger’s vision over a larger portion of the windshield and side windows, the Wrangler has standard extendable sun visors. The G-Class doesn’t offer extendable visors.

Economic Advantages Comparison

Insurance will cost less for the Wrangler owner. The Complete Car Cost Guide estimates that insurance for the Wrangler will cost $8940 to $10960 less than the G-Class over a five-year period.

The Wrangler will cost the buyer less in the long run because of its superior resale value. The Intellichoice estimates that the Wrangler will retain 66.73% to 77.65% of its original price after five years, while the G-Class only retains 45.57% to 47.38%.

Intellichoice estimates that five-year ownership costs (depreciation, financing, insurance, fuel, fees, repairs and maintenance) for the Jeep Wrangler will be $89285 to $96845 less than for the Mercedes G-Class.

Recommendations Comparison

The Jeep Wrangler has won recognition from these important consumer publications:

Wrangler

G-Class

Kiplinger’s Award

TRUE

FALSE

Intellichoice

A “Best Value in Class”

no award

Car and Driver performed a comparison test in its October 2012 issue and the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited won out over the Mercedes G550.

 The Wrangler Unlimited is ranked first in its class and received the 2015 “Total Quality Award.” The G-Class is not ranked.

The Wrangler was selected by Petersen's 4-Wheel & Off-Road magazine as their 2012 4x4 of the Year. The G-Class has never been chosen.

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