Certified Benz & Beemer Compares 2016 Acura TLX VS 2016 Jaguar XE Near Scottsdale, AZ

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2016 Acura TLX

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VS

2016 Jaguar XE

Safety Comparison

The TLX V6’s optional pre-crash front seatbelts will tighten automatically in the event the vehicle detects an impending crash, improving protection against injury significantly. The XE doesn’t offer pre-crash pretensioners.

Both the TLX and the XE have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, front parking sensors, available crash mitigating brakes, lane departure warning systems, blind spot warning systems, rear parking sensors and rear cross-path warning.

For its top level performance in the IIHS moderate overlap frontal impact, side impact, rear impact, roof-crush crash tests, an “Acceptable” rating in the newer small overlap frontal crash test, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the TLX its highest rating: “Top Pick Plus” for 2015, a rating granted to only 64 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The XE has not been tested, yet.

Warranty Comparison

Acura’s powertrain warranty covers the TLX 1 year and 10,000 miles longer than Jaguar covers the XE. Any repair needed on the engine, transmission, axles, joints or driveshafts is fully covered for 6 years or 70,000 miles. Coverage on the XE ends after only 5 years or 60,000 miles.

There are over 80 percent more Acura dealers than there are Jaguar dealers, which makes it much easier should you ever need service under the TLX’s warranty.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

An engine control system that can shut down half of the engine’s cylinders helps improve the TLX V6’s fuel efficiency. The XE doesn’t offer a system that can shut down part of the engine.

In heavy traffic or at stoplights the TLX V6 SH-AWD’s engine automatically turns off when the vehicle is stopped, saving fuel and reducing pollution. The engine is automatically restarted when the driver gets ready to move again. (Start/Stop isn’t accounted in present EPA fuel mileage tests.) The XE doesn’t offer an automatic engine start/stop system.

To lower fuel costs and make buying fuel easier, the Acura TLX uses regular unleaded gasoline (premium recommended for maximum performance). The XE requires premium, which can cost 20 to 55 cents more per gallon.

The TLX has a standard cap-less fueling system. The fuel filler is automatically opened when the fuel nozzle is inserted and automatically closed when it’s removed. This eliminates the need to unscrew and replace the cap and it reduces fuel evaporation, which causes pollution. The XE doesn’t offer a cap-less fueling system.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the TLX’s standard brake rotors are larger than those on the XE:

TLX

XE

Front Rotors

12.6 inches

12.4 inches

Rear Rotors

12.2 inches

11.8 inches

Tires and Wheels Comparison

The TLX has a standard easy tire fill system. When inflating the tires, the vehicle’s integrated tire pressure sensors keep track of the pressure as the tires fill and tell the driver when the tires are inflated to the proper pressure. The XE doesn’t offer vehicle monitored tire inflation.

Chassis Comparison

The TLX uses computer-generated active noise cancellation to help remove annoying noise and vibration from the passenger compartment, especially at low frequencies. The XE doesn’t offer active noise cancellation.

Ergonomics Comparison

The TLX offers a remote vehicle starting system, so the vehicle can be started from inside the driver's house. This allows the driver to comfortably warm up the engine before going out to the vehicle. The climate system will also automatically heat or cool the interior. The XE doesn’t offer a remote starting system.

Recommendations Comparison

The Acura TLX won three awards in Kiplinger’s 2015 car issue.

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