Certified Benz & Beemer Compares 2015 GMC Canyon VS 2015 Jeep Wrangler Near Scottsdale, AZ

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2015 GMC Canyon

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VS

2015 Jeep Wrangler

Safety Comparison

Both the Canyon Crew Cab and Wrangler Unlimited have child safety locks to prevent children from opening the rear doors. The Canyon has power child safety locks, allowing the driver to activate and deactivate them from the driver's seat and to know when they're engaged. The Wrangler’s child locks have to be individually engaged at each rear door with a manual switch. The driver can’t know the status of the locks without opening the doors and checking them.

The Canyon has standard head airbag curtains for front and rear seats that act as a forgiving barrier between the driver and outboard passenger's upper bodies and the window and pillars. Combined with high-strength steel door beams and lower side airbags this system increases head protection in broadside collisions. Head airbags cost extra in the Wrangler and are only available for the front seats.

The Canyon’s standard pretensioning seatbelts also sense rear collisions and remove slack from the front seatbelts to help protect the occupants from whiplash and other injuries. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a whiplash protection system.

The Canyon SLE/SLT offers an optional collision warning system, which detects an impending crash through forward mounted sensors and flashes a bright light and sounds a loud, distinctive tone to warn the driver to brake or maneuver immediately to avoid a collision. The Wrangler doesn't offer a collision warning system.

Full-time four-wheel drive is optional on the Canyon. Full-time four-wheel drive gives added traction for safety in all conditions, not just off-road, like the only system available on the Wrangler.

When descending a steep, off-road slope, the Canyon SLE’s optional Hill Descent Control allows you to creep down safely. The Wrangler doesn’t offer Hill Descent Control.

The GMC Canyon has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Wrangler doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Canyon SLE/SLT’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Canyon has a standard backup monitor to help drivers see any and all obstacles behind their vehicle. The Wrangler doesn’t offer any parking assist system.

The Canyon SLE/SLT’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

The Canyon offers optional OnStar ®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get turn-by-turn driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Canyon and the Wrangler have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, height-adjustable front shoulder belts, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control and electronic stability systems to prevent skidding.

Warranty Comparison

The Canyon’s corrosion warranty is 1 year longer than the Wrangler’s (6/100,000 vs. 5/100,000).

GMC pays for scheduled maintenance on the Canyon for 2 years and 24,000 miles. GMC will pay for oil changes, lubrication and any other required maintenance. Jeep doesn’t pay scheduled maintenance for the Wrangler.

Reliability Comparison

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2014 Initial Quality Study of new car owners surveyed provide the statistics that show that GMC vehicles are better in initial quality than Jeep vehicles. J.D. Power ranks GMC 16th in initial quality. With 30 more problems per 100 vehicles, Jeep is ranked 31st.

J.D. Power and Associates’ 2014 survey of the owners of three-year-old vehicles provides the long-term dependability statistics that show that GMC vehicles are more reliable than Jeep vehicles. J.D. Power ranks GMC 16th in reliability. With 45 more problems per 100 vehicles, Jeep is ranked 28th.

Engine Comparison

The Canyon’s optional 3.6 DOHC V6 produces 20 more horsepower (305 vs. 285) and 9 lbs.-ft. more torque (269 vs. 260) than the Wrangler’s 3.6 DOHC V6.

Fuel Economy and Range Comparison

On the EPA test cycle the Canyon 4x4 V6 gets better fuel mileage than the Wrangler Unlimited Auto (17 city/24 hwy vs. 16 city/20 hwy).

The Canyon has 2.4 gallons more fuel capacity than the Wrangler 2dr’s standard fuel tank (21 vs. 18.6 gallons), for longer range between fill-ups.

Brakes and Stopping Comparison

For better stopping power the Canyon’s brake rotors are larger than those on the Wrangler:

Canyon

Wrangler

Front Rotors

12.2 inches

11.9 inches

Rear Rotors

12.75 inches

11.9 inches

Tires and Wheels Comparison

For better traction, the Canyon has larger standard tires than the Wrangler (255/65R17 vs. 225/75R16). The Canyon’s tires are larger than the largest tires available on the Wrangler (265/70R16 vs. 255/75R17).

The Canyon’s standard tires provide better handling because they have a lower 70 series profile (height to width ratio) that provides a stiffer sidewall than the Wrangler’s standard 75 series tires. The Canyon SLT’s tires have a lower 60 series profile than the Wrangler Sahara’s 70 series tires.

The GMC Canyon’s wheels have 6 lugs for longer wheel bearing life, less chance of rotor warping and greater strength. The Jeep Wrangler only has 5 wheel lugs per wheel.

Suspension and Handling Comparison

The GMC Canyon’s independent front suspension is much lighter than the Jeep Wrangler’s solid front axle, which allows the Canyon’s wheels to react more quickly and accurately to the road’s surface, improving both ride and handling.

For much better steering response and tighter handling the Canyon has rack and pinion steering, like Formula race cars, instead of the recirculating-ball type steering of the Wrangler.

The Canyon has vehicle speed sensitive variable-assist power steering, for low-effort parking, better control at highway speeds and during hard cornering, and a better feel of the road. The Wrangler doesn’t offer variable-assist power steering.

For a smoother ride and more stable handling, the Canyon Extended Cab’s wheelbase is 32.9 inches longer than on the Wrangler 2dr (128.3 inches vs. 95.4 inches). The Canyon Long Box Crew Cab’s wheelbase is 24.5 inches longer than on the Wrangler Unlimited (140.5 feet vs. 116 inches).

Chassis Comparison

To almost totally eliminate engine vibration in the passenger area, the Canyon has liquid-filled engine mounts. The liquid helps further dampen engine harshness. The Wrangler uses conventional solid rubber engine mounts.

For excellent aerodynamics, the Canyon has standard flush composite headlights. The Wrangler has recessed headlights that spoil its aerodynamic shape and create extra drag.

The front grille of the Canyon uses electronically controlled shutters to close off airflow and reduce drag when less engine cooling is needed. This helps improve highway fuel economy. The Wrangler doesn’t offer active grille shutters.

Passenger Space Comparison

The Canyon Extended Cab has .1 inches more front headroom, 4 inches more front legroom, 1.7 inches more front shoulder room, 7.5 inches more rear hip room and 12.6 inches more rear shoulder room than the Wrangler 2dr.

The Canyon Crew Cab has .1 inches more front headroom, 4 inches more front legroom and 1.7 inches more front shoulder room than the Wrangler Unlimited.

Cargo Capacity Comparison

The Canyon Crew Cab has a much larger cargo area than the Wrangler 2dr with its rear seat up (41.3 vs. 12.8 cubic feet).

The Canyon Extended Cab has a much larger cargo area than the Wrangler Unlimited with its rear seat up (49.9 vs. 31.5 cubic feet).

The Canyon Extended Cab has a much larger cargo area than the Wrangler Unlimited with its rear seat up (49.9 vs. 31.5 cubic feet).

The Canyon Extended Cab has a much larger cargo area than the Wrangler 2dr with its rear seat up (49.9 vs. 12.8 cubic feet).

The GMC Canyon has a standard CornerStep, which allows for much easier access to the cargo area. The Jeep Wrangler doesn’t offer a rear cargo step.

The Canyon has stake post holes, to allow the containment of tall, light loads. The Wrangler doesn’t offer stake post holes.

Ergonomics Comparison

To help each driver find a more comfortable driving position, the Canyon SLE/SLT has a telescoping steering wheel. Much better than just a tilt steering wheel or adjustable seat, this allows a short driver to sit further from the steering wheel while maintaining contact with the pedals. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a telescoping steering wheel.

The Canyon’s instruments include an oil pressure gauge and a temperature gauge – which could save your engine! Often ‘idiot lights’ don’t warn you until damage has been done. The Wrangler does not have an oil pressure gauge.

The Canyon’s standard power windows allow the driver or passenger to lower and raise the windows without leaning over or being distracted. Power windows cost extra on the Wrangler.

The Canyon’s driver’s power window opens or closes with one touch of the window control, making it more convenient at drive-up windows and toll booths. The Wrangler’s optional driver’s power window switch has to be held the entire time to close it fully.

The Canyon’s standard power window controls are mounted on the armrest for easy access. The Wrangler’s optional power window controls are spread out on the center console where they can’t be seen without the driver completely removing his eyes from the road.

The Canyon’s standard power locks allow the driver or passenger to lock or unlock all the doors at a touch without leaning over. Power locks cost extra on the Wrangler.

The Canyon has a standard automatic headlight on/off feature. When the ignition is on, the headlights automatically turn on at dusk and off after dawn. The Wrangler has an automatic headlight on/off feature standard only on the Sahara/Rubicon.

The Canyon’s optional power mirror controls are mounted on the armrest for easy access. The Wrangler’s optional power mirror controls are on the center console where they can’t be seen without the driver completely removing his eyes from the road.

The Canyon has a standard center folding armrest for the rear passengers. A center armrest helps make rear passengers more comfortable. The Wrangler doesn’t offer a rear seat center armrest.

For greater rear passenger comfort, the Canyon has standard rear heat vents to keep rear occupants more comfortable. The Wrangler doesn’t offer rear vents.

Optional IntelliLink for the Canyon (not available SL) allows the driver and passengers access to select programs on their smartphones, including reading text messages aloud, playing internet radio stations and other connected activities without taking their eyes off the road or their hands from the wheel. The Wrangler doesn’t offer factory integrated smartphone program access.

Economic Advantages Comparison

The headlight lenses on the Canyon are made of plastic to be lighter, more resistant to damage and less expensive to replace than the glass headlight lenses on the Wrangler.

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