How does a 2009 Chevrolet CORVETTE compare to its competition in Safety Near Scottsdale, AZ?


 
  • Certified Benz & Beemer Journal
  • Jul 10th 2018 - 128 days ago
  • Scottsdale, AZ
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Compared To Dodge Viper 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Dodge Viper doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Corvette offers optional front and available rear seat tall, head-protecting side-impact airbags, which act as a forgiving barrier between the passengers and the door. Combined with high-strength steel door beams this system increases protection from broadside collisions. The Viper doesn\'t offer side-impact airbags.

To prevent wheelspin and loss of control under poor traction conditions, full range traction control is standard on the Chevrolet Corvette. The Dodge Viper doesn’t offer traction control.

The Corvette has a standard Active Handling System, which uses the antilock brake hardware along with powerful software and additional sensors to detect the beginning of a skid. The Active Handling System then intervenes by automatically applying the brake at one appropriate wheel, preventing a skid. The Viper doesn’t offer skid prevention. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed that skid control systems reduced single-vehicle car crashes by 30%.

The Chevrolet Corvette has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Viper doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Viper doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the Viper have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks and four-wheel antilock brakes.




Compared To Honda S2000 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Honda S2000 doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Corvette offers optional front and available rear seat tall, head-protecting side-impact airbags, which act as a forgiving barrier between the passengers and the door. Combined with high-strength steel door beams this system increases protection from broadside collisions. The S2000 doesn\'t offer side-impact airbags.

Compared to metal, the Corvette’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Honda S2000 has a metal gas tank.

The Corvette’s gas tank is mounted inside the frame rails in front of the rear axle to optimally protect the fuel tank in a collision. The Honda S2000’s gas tank is mounted behind the rear axle, where it is more susceptible to rear collisions.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The S2000 doesn’t offer a GPS response system.

Both the Corvette and the S2000 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control and electronic stability systems to prevent skidding.




Compared To Porsche Boxster 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Porsche Boxster doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Chevrolet Corvette has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Boxster doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Boxster doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the Boxster have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.




Compared To Ford Mustang 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Ford Mustang doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Corvette has standard four-wheel antilock disc brakes for quicker stops and controlled steering ability, especially under poor traction conditions. Antilock brakes cost extra on the Ford Mustang.

The Corvette has a standard Active Handling System, which uses the antilock brake hardware along with powerful software and additional sensors to detect the beginning of a skid. The Active Handling System then intervenes by automatically applying the brake at one appropriate wheel, preventing a skid. The Mustang doesn’t offer skid prevention. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed that skid control systems reduced single-vehicle car crashes by 30%.

The Chevrolet Corvette has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Mustang doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

Compared to metal, the Corvette’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Ford Mustang has a metal gas tank.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Mustang doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the Mustang have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.




Compared To Aston Martin V8 Vantage 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Aston Martin V8 Vantage doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The V8 Vantage cannot safely hold a rear facing infant safety seat, the only safe, legal way to transport babies from birth to one year old. Because the V8 Vantage has no rear seats, the only unoccupied seat faces the passenger side airbag, which can injure or kill a baby in a rear facing safety seat. The Corvette’s passenger side airbag has a weight sensor switch to disable it.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The V8 Vantage doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the V8 Vantage have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.




Compared To Ford Shelby GT500 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Ford Shelby GT500 doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Corvette has a standard Active Handling System, which uses the antilock brake hardware along with powerful software and additional sensors to detect the beginning of a skid. The Active Handling System then intervenes by automatically applying the brake at one appropriate wheel, preventing a skid. The Shelby GT500 doesn’t offer skid prevention. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed that skid control systems reduced single-vehicle car crashes by 30%.

The Chevrolet Corvette has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Shelby GT500 doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

Compared to metal, the Corvette’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Ford Shelby GT500 has a metal gas tank.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Shelby GT500 doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the Shelby GT500 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.




Compared To Cadillac XLR 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Cadillac XLR doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

Both the Corvette and the XLR have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.




Compared To Dodge Challenger 2009



For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Chevrolet Corvette are height adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Dodge Challenger doesn’t offer height adjustable seat belts.

The Corvette has a standard Active Handling System, which uses the antilock brake hardware along with powerful software and additional sensors to detect the beginning of a skid. The Active Handling System then intervenes by automatically applying the brake at one appropriate wheel, preventing a skid. A skid prevention system costs extra on the Challenger. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study showed that skid control systems reduced single-vehicle car crashes by 30%.

The Chevrolet Corvette has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Challenger doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Corvette has standard OnStar®, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to get driving directions, remotely unlock your doors if you lock your keys in, help track down your vehicle if it’s stolen or send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Challenger doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies.

Both the Corvette and the Challenger have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, available front and rear side-impact airbags and head airbags.